Saturday, 12 November 2016

Invisibility of Nature's Laws


This post was initially going to be called Invisibility of Psychological Realities but it occurred to me that Nature's Laws, physical or psychological, are all largely invisible.

It is one of the distinguishing traits of Mystery Traditions, like Tarot with its Major and Minor arcanas, to consider the invisible realm - which includes the subconscious - as real as the physical realm.

It could be argued to be much more real in so far as what we perceive with our eyes only consists of the spectrum of visible light which is a minute fraction of all that is extant in the world and universe. 

This is true too of psychological realities. For instance one might not consciously perceive hostility that another has for one's person if they do not express it but the subconscious probably will and eventually that hostility will eventually manifest in word or deed, e.g. in a friendship or relationship.  

It could be argued that the subconscious perceives everything as it is but it takes a trigger, a spark, a happening for much of the data it contains to reach a conscious level. 

This is precisely what the art of thinking is about.
"As soon as we have the thing before our eyes, and in our hearts an ear for the word, thinking prospers."
The genuine thoughts that are one's own - as opposed to someone else's - spring from the subconscious and by some yet-to-be-discovered mechanism may come to conscious awareness and be verbally expressed. 

In terms of psychological laws, all that is suppressed and kept buried will likely come into manifestation after a period of time and all that is present in the invisible realm will enter the visible so that, for example, hostilities or incompatibilities between two friends or partners will eventually come out in the open.

On a more positive note, mutual love two people have for one another will also likely come out in the open - if they let it - and this process of invisible psychological reality entering the visible realm governs a great deal of the rich and tragicomic tapestry of human interconnection. 

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